Thursday, February 22, 2018

50 Free Writing Contests in March 2018 - No entry fees

Pixabay
Spring is right around the corner! The birds are singing, the flowers are (almost) blooming, and there are new opportunities for writers.

With 50 to choose from, March is a great month for free writing contests. As always, every form and genre is represented. There are prizes for novel manuscripts, poetry, short stories, essays, works of nonfiction, children's books and more. Some of these contests have age and regional restrictions, so be sure to check submission guidelines before submitting.

Many contests are offered annually, so if you miss your ideal contest this year,  you can always enter next year. For a month-by-month list of free contests see: Writing Contests. (You can also get a jump on next month's contests by checking that page periodically.)

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Madeline P. Plonsker Emerging Writer's Residency PrizeRestrictions: Open to an emerging poet under forty years old—with no major book publication. Genre: Poetry - manuscript in progress. Prize: Stipend of $10,000 with a housing suite and campus meals provided by the College, and three weeks in residence on the Lake Forest College campus during the Spring 2017 term. Possible publication. Deadline: March 1, 2018.

The Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award is sponsored by Broadside Lotus Press. Restrictions: This competition is open to African American poets only. If you have already had a book published by Lotus Press, you are ineligible. However, inclusion in a Lotus Press anthology does not disqualify you. Genres: Poetry collections of approximately 60-90 pages. Prize: $500 in cash and publication  by Broadside Lotus Press within the first three months of 2017 as well as free copies and discounts. Deadline: March 1, 2018.

Honeysuckle Chapbook ContestGenre: Poetry and short stories. Manuscripts should be no shorter than 20 pages and no longer than 40 pages. This does not include the table of contents, title page, or identity statement. You may submit one chapbook in poetry and in prose. There should be no more than one poem per page. Prize: $500, print publication, author copies, distribution in bookstores across America, and a jar of berry jam. Deadline: March 1, 2018.

Balticon Poetry Contest. Sponsored by the Baltimore Science Fiction Society. Genre: Speculative poetry. Prize: 1st prize: $100; 2nd prize: $75; 3rd prize: $50. Deadline: March 1, 2018.

Beverly Hopkins Memorial Poetry Contest for High School StudentsRestrictions: High school students living within 100 miles of St. Louis. Genre: Poetry. Prize: First prize $200, Second prize $125, Third prize $75. Deadline: March 1, 2018.

The Irish Post's Creative Writing CompetitionRestrictions: Open to Irish residents of the UK. Genre: Fiction on an Irish theme. Prizes: €500, publication in the Irish Post, and a trip to the Listowel Writers’ Week in Co. Kerry. Deadline: March 1, 2018.

Lewis Galantiere AwardRestrictions: Open to US citizens or permanent residents. Genre: Translation of book-length literary work from any language, except German, into English. Entries must have been published in the US in the past two years. Prize: $1000. Deadline: March 1, 2018.

The Premises:CLOTHES. Write a creative, compelling, well-crafted story in which one or more pieces of clothing play an important role. Genre: Short story. Length: Between 1,000 and 5,000 words. Prize: Between US$60 and US$220, and publication. Deadline: 11:59 PM Eastern US time, March 2, 2018.

Christopher Tower Poetry CompetitionRestrictions: Open to UK students between 16-18 years of age. Genre: Poetry, one poem, maximum 48 lines. Theme is "wonder." Prize: £3,000. Deadline: March 2, 2018.

"It's All Write!" Teen Short Story ContestRestrictions: Open to Grades 6-12. Genre: Short story, and flash fiction, unpublished. Prize: 1st Place $250, 2nd Place $150, 3rd Place $100. Deadline: March 4, 2018.

RBC Bronwen Wallace Award for Emerging WritersGenre: Short fiction. Restrictions: Candidates must be: A Canadian citizen or permanent resident; Under the age of 35 as of March 5, 2018; Previously published in an independently edited magazine or anthology; Unpublished in book form and without a book contract. Prizes: Winner: $5,000; Finalists: $1,000. Deadline: March 5, 2018.

NEA Literature Fellowships are sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts. Prize: $25,000 grants in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) and poetry to published creative writers that enable recipients to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. Deadline: March 7, 2018.

Common Good Books Poetry Contest is sponsored by Common Good Books, proprietor Garrison Keillor. Genre: Poetry. Poems must be set in St Paul, in the winter. Prize: Grand prizes of $1000 each, and four poets will receive $500 for poems of particular meritDeadline: March 9, 2018. 

Nantucket Directory Poetry Contest.  Genre: poem about Nantucket Island. Prize: $250 and publication in the print and online editions of the Nantucket Directory. Deadline: March 10, 2018.

Nature-Saving ScholarshipRestrictions: Open to High School and College students. Genre: Original list of nature-saving rules. Prize: $1,000 or $500 scholarship. Deadline: March 11, 2018.

BBC National Short Story AwardRestrictions: Open to UK residents or nationals, aged 18 or over, who have a history of publication in creative writing. Genre: Short fiction. Prize: £15,000 to the winner, £3,000 for the runner-up and £500 for three further shortlisted writers. Deadline: March 12, 2018.

North Carolina Poetry ContestRestrictions: Open to residents of North Carolina (including students). Genre: Poetry. Prize: $1,000. Deadline: March 12, 2018. Snail mail entries only.

Wilbur Smith Adventure Writing PrizeGenre: Adventure writing novel. Separate categories for published and unpublished books. Self-published books accepted. Prize: £15,000. Deadline: March 12, 2018.

Hodson Trust–John Carter Brown Library FellowshipGenre: Nonfiction (includes creative nonfiction). A book-in-process  relating to the literature, history, culture, or art of the Americas before 1830. Award: $20,000. Deadline: March 15, 2018.

Alpine FellowshipGenre: Pieces of any genre up to 2500 words on the theme of “Childhood.”  Prize: The first place winner receives £3000 and an invitation to enter the symposium in Venice (two runners-up also receive the invitation). Deadline: March 15, 2018. 

Gordon Burn PrizeRestrictions: Open to permanent US or UK residents. Genre: Fiction or nonfiction book first published in the US or UK between July 1 of the preceding year and July 1 of the deadline year. Prize: 5,000 pounds and 3-month writing retreat at Gordon Burn's cottage in Berwickshire. Deadline: March 15, 2018.

Governor General's Literary Awards. Restrictions: Books must have been written or translated by Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Canada. They do not need to be residing in Canada. Genre: The Governor General’s Literary Awards are given annually to the best English-language and the best French-language book in each of the seven categories of Fiction, Literary Non-fiction, Poetry, Drama, Young People’s Literature (Text), Young People’s Literature (Illustrated Books) and Translation (from French to English). Prize: $25,000. Deadline: March 15, 2018.

Iris N. Spencer Undergraduate Poetry AwardRestrictions: Open to undergraduate poets who are enrolled in a United States college or university. Genre: Poetry composed in the traditional modes of meter, rhyme and received forms. Prize: First prize $1,500, and a runner-up prize $500. Deadline: March 15, 2018.

Myong Cha Son Haiku AwardRestrictions: Open to undergraduate poets who are enrolled in a United States college or university. Genre: Haiku. Prize: First prize $1,500, and a runner-up prize $500. Deadline: March 15, 2018.

Rhina P. Espaillat Poetry AwardRestrictions: Open to undergraduate poets who are enrolled in a United States college or university. Genre: Original poems written in Spanish and translations of English poems to Spanish. Prize: First prize $1,500, and a runner-up prize $500. Deadline: March 15, 2018.

Lynn DeCaro Poetry ContestRestrictions: Open to Connecticut Student Poets in Grades 9-12. Genre: Poetry. Prize: 1st $75, 2nd $50, 3rd $25. Deadline: March 15, 2018.

The Eugene & Marilyn Glick Indiana Authors Award seeks to elevate the written arts in Indiana. Restrictions: Any living published writer who was born in Indiana or has lived in Indiana for at least five years will be eligible. Authors who have published works of fiction, prose, poetry and/or non-fiction are eligible; reference works, scholarly monographs and books of photography will not be considered. Self-published authors are considered. Prize: National Author: $10,000 cash prize and $2,500 grant for his or her hometown Indiana public library. Regional Author: $7,500 cash prize and $2,500 grant for his or her hometown Indiana public library. Emerging Author: $5,000 cash prize and $2,500 grant for his or her hometown Indiana public library. Deadline: March 16, 2018.

Thresholds International Short Fiction Feature Writing CompetitionGenre: Nonfiction feature in one of two categories: Author Profile: exploring the life, writings and influence of a single short story writer. We Recommend: personal recommendations of a collection, anthology, group of short stories or a single short story. Prize: 1st prize of £500, runner-up prize of £100. Deadline: March 18, 2018.

Jane Martin Poetry Prize (UK)Restrictions: Open to  UK residents between 18 and 30 years of age. Genre: Poetry. Prize: £700, second prize, £300. Deadline: March 19, 2018.

Eliza So Finish-Your-Book FellowshipRestrictions: There are two fellowships, one for immigrant writers, and one for Native Americans with affiliations to Montana. Genre: A novel, collection of stories, or memoir in progress (100 pages minimum) or poetry collection in progress (30 pages minimum). Prize: The fellowship includes room and board at Las Vegas' Writer's Block in the fall or winter of 2018, along with a $500 food stipend and $400 toward airfare. Deadline: March 25, 2018.

Nicholas A. Virgilio Memorial Haiku Competition for High School StudentsRestrictions: Open to students in Grades 7-12. Genre: Haiku. Prizes: $50. Deadline: March 25, 2018.

The Gover Story PrizeGenre: Short Fiction & Creative Nonfiction. Works of short prose must be less than 10,000 words, previously unpublished, or published with a circulation of less than 500. Prize: $250.00. Deadline: March 25, 2018. No reprints or simultaneous submissions.

Digital and Technology ScholarshipRestrictions: Open to college students. Genre: Article or essay or info graphics in at least 1000 words on tech topic. Prize: $500.00 scholarship. Deadline: March 25, 2018.

The Lakefly Writers ConferenceRestrictions: Open to residents of Wisconsin. GenresShort story fiction:  1500 words or less. Any genre. Flash fiction:  500 words or less. Any genre. No theme. Poetry:  All poems, free verse to formal and everything in between—75 lines max. Theme: Wisconsin Choices. The Jean Nelson Essay for Young Adults: For young adult writers (ages 12 through 17). 2500 words or less. Theme: Notable Wisconsin figure (living or dead) who most inspires me. Prize: First place winners will receive a cash prize of $100; second place winners will receive $75; and third place winners will receive $50. Winners must be able to attend an awards ceremony. Deadline: March 30, 2018.

Sunken Garden Poetry Festival's Fresh Voices CompetitionRestrictions: New England high school students. Prize: Reading at the Sunken Garden Poetry Festival on August 5, 2018 and publication.  Deadline: March 30, 2018.

The Golden Baobab Prize for Early Chapter BooksRestrictions: Entry is open to citizens of an African country. A copy of a passport or comparable document will be required of winners and long listed entrants. There are no restrictions on age or race. Genre: Unpublished manuscript for an early chapter book targeting readers aged 9 to 11 years old. Stories must be set in Africa or have a very evident African content. Prize: $5,000 (USD), the opportunity to publish with and receive royalties from Golden Baobab’s African and international publishing partners. Deadline: March 31, 2018.

Rachel Wetzsteon Chapbook AwardGenre: Poetry chapbook (30 pages). Prize: $250. Deadline: March 31, 2018. (After this date, there is a $5 fee to submit)

Natan Book AwardGenre: Nonfiction. The book should address one or more of Natan’s grant areas. Broadly understood, these are: the reinvention of Jewish life and community for the 21st century; changing notions of individual and collective identity for 21st century Jews; and the evolving relationship between Israel and world Jewry. The award is open to non-fiction books that have an existing publishing contract with a recognized commercial publisher. (Academic publishers are also acceptable in certain cases where the book is intended to appeal to mainstream audiences.) Prize: The Award is a two-stage award, offering at most a total of $25,000, to be divided as follows: a cash award to the author of $10,000, to be used during the writing process; and customized support for the marketing and publicity strategy for the book, up to $15,000. This is a pre-publication award and the prize winner will be announced prior to the book's publication date. Deadline: March 31, 2018.

Foley Poetry ContestGenre: One unpublished poem on any topic. The poem should be 30 lines or fewer and not under consideration elsewhere. Prize: $1000. Deadline: March 31, 2018.

The Willie Morris Award for Southern FictionGenre: Novel published in 2017 (50,000 words minimum). Book has to be set in one of the original eleven states in the Confederacy. (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.) Prize: $2,500.00, and an expense paid trip to New York City. (The winner must come to NY to receive the award, attend a luncheon with the contest judges and a reception in his/her honor.) Deadline: March 31, 2018.

L. Ron Hubbard's Writers of the Future ContestRestrictions: open only to those who have not professionally published a novel or short novel, or more than one novelette, or more than three short stories, in any medium. Genres: Science fiction, fantasy and dark fantasy up to 17,000 words. Prizes: Three cash prizes in each quarter: a First Prize of $1,000, a Second Prize of $750, and a Third Prize of $500, in US dollars. In addition, at the end of the year the winners will have their entries rejudged, and a Grand Prize winner shall be determined and receive an additional $5,000. Deadline: March 31, 2018.

Jack L. Chalker Young Writers' ContestsRestrictions: Open to writers between 14 and 18 years of age as of May 29 in the contest year who reside in, or attend school in Maryland. Genre: Science fiction or fantasy, 2,500 words max. Prizes: $150, $100 and $75. Deadline: March 31, 2018.

Sarah Mook Poetry Prize for StudentsRestrictions: Students in grades K-12. Genre: Poetry.  Prize: $100. Deadline: March 31, 2018.

Saif Ghobash Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary TranslationGenre: Poetry or literary prose. Translation of modern Arabic literature into English. Books must have been published between April 1, 2017 and March 31, 2018 and be available for purchase in the UK via a distributor or online. The source text must have been published in the original Arabic in or after 1967. Must be submitted by publisher. Prize: £3,000. Deadline: March 31, 2018.

Archibald Lamp­man AwardRestrictionsOpen to residents of Canada's National Capital region (Ottawa). Genre: Book of any genre published by a recognized publisher. Prize: $1500. Deadline: March 31, 2018.

Jacklyn Potter Young Poets CompetitionRestrictions: Open to high school students in the Washington, DC region. Genre: Poetry. Prize: A reading with honorarium in the Miller Poetry Series, a summer program occurring in June and July. Deadline: March 31, 2018.

Lake Superior State University High School Short Story PrizeRestrictions: Open to high school students students residing in the Midwestern United States (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) or Ontario, Canada. Genre: Short fiction. The theme is Historical Fiction. Prize: $500 and publication.  Deadline: March 31, 2018.

Save the Earth Poetry PrizeRestrictions: Open to high school students, grades 11 & 12. Genre: Poem (1). Poems submitted should, in any way possible, evoke humankind’s awareness of the natural world and nature as such. Prize: $200 awarded to seven winners. Deadline: March 31, 2018.

Speculative Literature Foundation Older Writers GrantRestrictions: Open to writers who are fifty years of age or older at the time of grant application. Genre: Speculative fiction. Prize: $500.   Deadline: March 31, 2018.

Value of Being Fit Scholarship ProgramRestrictions: Open to students who are currently enrolled in colleges, universities or high schools. Genre: Essay, info graphics, or article (750-1000 words) on “How can you remain fit forever.” Prize: $750.  Deadline: March 31, 2018.

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

28 Awesome Writing Conferences in March 2018

Jonathan Wolstenholme
March is officially the beginning of spring, and time for writers to come out of hibernation and congregate!

There are some great conferences this month. If your manuscript is complete, you can pitch it to agents at several conferences, including Sleuthfest in Florida (for mystery writers), Write Stuff in Pennsylvania, and the big New York Pitch Fest. There are also retreats and workshops for writers who just need to get away for awhile to get the creative juices flowing.

Attending a conference is one of the best things you can do for your writing career. Conferences offer a unique opportunity to network with other writers, meet agents and pitch your book, and learn how the publishing industry works from editors and professionals.

I strongly urge you to plan ahead if you are thinking of attending a writing conference. Many offer scholarships that can significantly reduce the cost. And all of the intensive writing workshops have application deadlines. For a month-by-month list of conferences throughout the year see: Writing Conferences. (You will also find links to resources that can help you find conferences in your area on that page.) If you miss your ideal conference this year, plan for next year.
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Sleuthfest. March 1 - 4, 2018, Boca Raton, FL. Sponsored by the Florida Chapter of Mystery Writers of America a conference for writers and fans. Features writing workshops, social events, and pitch sessions, including:
* Agent Appointments to pitch your finished work
* Critiques of your 10 page manuscript submission
* Forensic track with current forensic techniques & hands-on workshops
* Social events to mingle with agents, editors and your favorite authors
* Auction to purchase critiques of your work by bestselling authors
* Sessions on the craft of writing
* Sessions on marketing and promoting your work
* Practice your Pitch sessions with experienced authors

Winter Writers' Weekend. March 2 - 4, 2018, Princeton, New Jersey. Workshops on self-publishing, book covers, getting book reviews, How to Sell 10,000 Books, The Editor/Author Relationship: What You Can Expect and more. Cost $200.

A One Day Retreat for Poets and Writers. March 3, 2018, Princeton, NJ. "Do you want to publish your writing but struggle with a lack of know-how and fear of rejection? Join us for this hands-on workshop where we will guide you through the process from blank page to published piece. If you are an aspiring author you will learn how and where to submit your work. If you are experienced you will discover new markets and resources to expand your readership. Whether you are working on a novel, memoir, short stories, personal essays or poetry, you will go home with an action plan and the tools to carry it out."

Redrock Creative Writing Seminar, St. George, Utah, March 3, 2018. Classes and readings in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. The faculty includes poet Jim Barton, Dr. Cindy King, and Lara Candland.

Association of Writers & Writing Programs Conference. March 7 - 10, 2018, Tampa, FL. "The AWP Conference & Bookfair is an essential annual destination for writers, teachers, students, editors, and publishers. Each year more than 12,000 attendees join our community for four days of insightful dialogue, networking, and unrivaled access to the organizations and opinion-makers that matter most in contemporary literature. The 2016 conference featured over 2,000 presenters and 550 readings, panels, and craft lectures. The bookfair hosted over 800 presses, journals, and literary organizations from around the world. AWP’s is now the largest literary conference in North America."

Algonkian Novel Retreat, Sterling, Virginia, March 7 - 11, 2018. "In keeping with the spirit of this place and the goals of this retreat, you can be as goal-oriented or as hesitant in approach as you wish. You can show us your manuscript, improve your skills, clear your head, have your work read by our writer mentors, whatever works for you, whatever helps you grow and discover your vision as a writer. You discuss with us ahead of time via the Algonkian Writer Retreat Application the goals you wish to accomplish, and we'll work with you to make it happen. Do you desire a review of your short stories or flash fiction? A line edit? Do you wish to discuss the reality of the current fiction market, your novel project, plot and characters, or perhaps get feedback on the opening hook or a few sample chapters? Or would you simply like a relaxed and productive dialogue about your goals as a writer?"  Registration is first come, first served.

Writer’s High Retreat. March 9 - 11, 2018, Dawsonville, Georgia. The retreat features workshops for poets, fiction writers, and creative nonfiction writers, as well as readings, talks, and open mics. Featured speakers include fiction writer Patti Callahan Henry and agent, fiction writer, and nonfiction writer Nick Chiles. The cost of the retreat, which includes lodging and all meals, is $733 for a single room and $579 for a double room. Space is limited; Registration is first come, first served. The registration deadline is February 23.

Atlanta Writing Workshop, March 10, 2018, Atlanta, GA. A full-day of “How to Get Published.” Attending literary agents and editors: Ali Herring (Spencerhill Associates), Cherry Weiner (Weiner Literary), Sally Apokedak (Leslie H. Stobbe Literary Agency), Latoya C. Smith (L. Perkins Agency), Kristy Hunter (The Knight Agency), Samantha Fountain (Corvisiero Agency), Lauren Jablonski (St. Martin’s Press), Julie Gwinn (The Seymour Agency) and more to come.

Bay to Ocean Writers Conference. Wye Mills, Maryland, March 10, 2018. Sponsored by the Eastern Shore Writers Association. "The BTO conference features workshops, presentations, and panel discussions on a wide variety of topics pertaining to the craft of writing, publishing, marketing, the Internet, and the intricacies of particular genres. It is an opportunity to meet with many writing peers in the region. Speakers include accomplished authors, poets, film writers, writing instructors, editors, and publishers. BTO also offers one-on-one manuscript reviews with experienced writing instructors and editors for registered attendees for a fee."

Wik '18. Society of Childrens Book Writers and Illustrators. Hoover, Alabama, March 10-11, 2018. Conference for children's book writers and illustrators. Faculty includes writers, illustrators, agents, editors, and publishers.

Moravian College Writers' Conference. March 16 - 17, 2018, Bethlehem, PA. Workshops, craft talks, and more on the theme of Writing & Health. Writers of all genres & at all career stages welcome! Keynote speaker Marie Myung-Ok Lee and special guest faculty including Nina Angela McKissock, Gillian Pidcock , Mary Heather Noble, and Fran Quigley. Costs: $125. Includes workshop, craft talk, and faculty roundtable; faculty readings and book signings; Fri. welcome reception and Sat. lunch. Hotel discounts in historic Bethlehem, PA.

Colrain One-Day Retreat: What is a Poetry Manuscript? March  17, 2018, Barred Owl Retreat, Leicester, Massachusetts.The Colrain One-Day Informational Retreat is designed for poets who wish to learn the basics of a poetry manuscript before submitting to presses and/or applying to the Colrain Poetry Manuscript Conference.  In a small group (8-10 poets) team-led by two seasoned Colrain Poetry Manuscript facilitators.

Beall Poetry Festival. March 21 - 23, 2018, Waco, TX. The festival features readings, panel discussions, and the Virginia Beall Ball Lecture on Contemporary Poetry. Participating poets include Kwame Dawes, Dania Gioia, Mark Jarman, and Lisa Russ Spaar. All events are free and open to the public.

University of North Dakota Writers Conference. March 21 - 23, 2018, Grand Forks, North Dakota. Theme: Truth and Lies. This year's authors/artists include Molly McCully Brown, Nicholas Galanin, David Grann, Marlon James, Lauren Markham, and Ocean Vuong. FREE and open to the public.

Virginia Festival of the Book, March 21 - 25, 2018. "The Festival is the largest community-based book event in the Mid-Atlantic region and has attracted audiences of more than 20,000 for each of the past thirteen years. We have presented a captivating list of authors, ranging from international bestsellers to topical specialists to debut authors." Book exhibits, talks by authors, readings, workshops on book promotion, finding an agent, poetry, publishing, agents roundtable - you name it, this conference has it.

Write Stuff Writers Conference. March 22 - 24, 2018, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Workshops, sessions on craft and business of writing. Meetings with agents, editors, and book coaches, book fair, and more. Keynote Speaker: Bob Mayer. Pre-conference workshops: Bob Mayer, Jane Cleland. Additionally on Saturday will be the above plus Ben Sobieck, Matt Betts, Tabitha Jorgensen, Richard White, and Dan Krippene.

The Furious Flower Poetry Center Collegiate Summit. March 22-24, 2018. Harrisonburg, VA. Open to undergraduate and graduate students from any college or university program, this three-day summit invites participants to explore how poetry reaches across geographical borders and beyond conventional literary and ideological boundaries. The program includes in-depth workshops facilitated by distinguished poets Brenda Marie Osbey and Anastacia Reneè, a reading and presentation by the 2017 Pulitzer Prize winner Tyehimba Jess, roundtable discussions, a day-trip to Charlottesville for the Virginia Festival of the Book, and a closing open mic session for participating student poets. The registration fee is $50 per person. Registration is open until full.

Algonkian Writers New York Pitch Conference, March 22 - 25, 2018, NY, NY. "The event focuses on the art of the novel pitch as the best method not only for communicating your work, but for having you and your work taken seriously by industry professionals. More importantly though, it is also a diagnostic method for workshopping the plot, premise, and other elements of the story to determine quality and marketability. Simply put, you cannot successfully pitch a viable commercial novel if you don't have a viable commercial novel. Our goal, therefore, is to set you on a realistic path to publication."

Everything You Need to Know About Children’s Book Publishing A Crash Course. Honesdale, PA. March 22 -25, 2018. Sponsored by Highlights for children, this is an intensive workshop covering  every aspect of publishing children's books.

14th National Black Writers Conference, "Gathering at the Waters: Healing, Legacy, and Activism in Black Literature." March 22 -25, 2018, Brooklyn, NY. Award-winning writers Colson Whitehead, Kwame Dawes, David Levering Lewis, Susan L. Taylor, speculative fiction writers Steven Barnes and Tananarive Due, and cultural historian Eugene B. Redmond are 2018 National Black Writers Conference Honorees.

Mountain Valley Writers Conference. March 23 - 24, 2018, Guntersville, Alabama. Author signings, giveaways, workshops, learning sessions, and networking opportunities. An introducing Word War,  a community-wide event featuring panel discussions, author readings, contest winners, word war competitions, and an after party!

The Work Conference. March 23 - 25, 2018, New York City. "The Work is a boutique writers’ conference, meaning it’s purposefully small, highly personalized, and focused on bringing 30 hard-working authors together for an unforgettable weekend." Faculty: Leon Husock, Sarah Levitt, Daniel Kirschen, Heather Flaherty, Natalie Halla, Kerin Wicks, Adriann Ranta Zurhellen, Jennifer Udden, Alex Arnold, Monica Odom, Stephanie Delman, Annie Hwang, Tiffany Liao, Laura Chasen, Katie Grimm.

WonderCon, March 23 - March 25, 2018, Anaheim, CA. HUGE comic book convention.

Authors' Salon at Clockwork Alchemy. March 23 - 25, 2018, Burlingame, California, Faculty Harry Turtledove, Kirsten Weiss, TE MacArthur, AJ Sikes, BJ Sikes, Anthony Francis, David Drake, Katherine Morse, Dover Whitecliff, Mike Tierney, Lillian Csernica, Sumiko Saulson, Kale Lawrence.

Great Plains Writers Conference. March 23 - 25, 2018, South Dakota State University. "Intimate conversations about the writing craft."

Antioch Writers' Workshop. March 24, 2018, Yellow Springs, Ohio. "Explore all the elements, from start to finish, that you'll need to master to tell YOUR story, whether in the form of fiction (novel, short story) or creative nonfiction (memoir, personal essay, or narrative.) We'll start with generating ideas, move on to drafting, revising and editing techniques, and finish up with submitting your work. After a full day chock-full of helpful and inspirational tips and techniques, you'll go home with a tool-kit to help you on every step of the way to telling your story!" The cost for the full-day program is $150.00

Create Something Magical Conference. March 24 - 25, 2018, Woodbridge, New Jersey and Edison, New Jersey. Workshops and panels. Faculty: J. Kenner, Dee Davis, Chris Redding and more.

33rd Annual National Undergraduate Literature Conference, March 29 - March 31, 2018, Weber State University, Ogden, UT. "Each year, nearly 200 undergraduate writers and poets throughout North America, and sometimes beyond, come to Weber State University to present their work and learn from some of the most important writers in contemporary literature."

Thursday, February 15, 2018

2 New Agents Actively Seeking Kidlit, Scifi, Fantasy, LGBTQ+ Characters

Here are two agents currently building their client lists. Kieryn Ziegler is accepting queries for all genres. In fiction, she especially loves books about exciting new worlds, found families, fantastic female characters, and stories with diverse POVs, and would love to see more LGBTQ+ characters in sci-fi and fantasy. Elizabeth Rudnick's interests primarily lie with middle-grade and young adult fiction of all types—from realistic fiction to fantasy (with a special soft spot for horse- and dragon-related titles). In addition to building her client list, she is focusing on packaging efforts, pairing high-concept ideas and story-lines with strong writers.

ALWAYS check the agency website before submitting. Agents may switch agencies or close their lists, and submission requirements may change.

If these agents do not suit your needs, you can find a comprehensive list of new and established agents seeking clients here: Agents Seeking Clients.



Kieryn Ziegler of Dystel, Goderich & Bourret

Kieryn Ziegler joined DG&B in 2017 as the assistant to Michael Bourret in the West Coast office. She grew up in central Pennsylvania and moved to LA to study at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts, where she graduated with a BFA in Writing for Screen & Television. Aside from good books and good TV, she’s a big fan of dogs, road trips, and coffee shops with lots of outlets.

What she is seeking: Kieryn is accepting queries for all genres. In fiction, she especially loves books about exciting new worlds, found families, fantastic female characters, and stories with diverse POVs, and would love to see more LGBTQ+ characters in sci-fi and fantasy.

How to submit: Please send queries to kziegler@dystel.com, along with the first 25 pages (or nearest chapter break) of your manuscript. See these submission guidelines for more query guidelines and information on nonfiction proposals.


Elizabeth Rudnick of Mackenzie Wolf

Elizabeth has been working in the publishing industry for over fifteen years. After attending Middlebury College where she majored in American Civilization, she completed the Columbia Publishing Course and discovered a passion for editing young adult and middle grade fiction. A ten year career at Disney/Hyperion followed, during which she worked with best-selling authors such as Melissa de la Cruz, Lisa Papademetriou, Melissa Kantor, and Kathryn Williams and helped bring box-office hits such as Pirates of the Caribbean, Tron, Enchanted, and Prince of Persia from big screen to the page. As a Senior Editor she worked with Miley Cyrus to develop her New York Times bestselling memoir, Miles to Go, and edited Jennifer Lopez's original series, Amigas. She was also responsible for developing a line of original fiction based on the worlds of Prince of Persia and Pirates of the Caribbean.

Elizabeth also writes her own children's books, including her original novel, Tweet Heart, as well as bestselling novelizations based on films such as Beauty and the Beast, Cinderella, Maleficent, Frankenweenie, and Frozen. To keep her finger on the pulse of the middle-grade reader, she has spent three years working as a 6th grade teacher, while continuing her writing and freelance editing.

What she is seeking: Her interests primarily lie with middle-grade and young adult fiction of all types—from realistic fiction to fantasy (with a special soft spot for horse- and dragon-related titles). In addition to building her client list, she is focusing on packaging efforts, pairing high-concept ideas and story-lines with strong writers.

How to submit: To submit a project, please send a query letter along with a 50-page writing sample (for fiction) or a detailed proposal (for nonfiction) to queries@mwlit.com. Samples may be submitted as an attachment or embedded in the body of the email. Please only query one agent at a time. A rejection from one agent means a rejection from all agents—please do not resubmit unless your project has been substantially revised.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Ursula K. LeGuin, My Hero: Dead at 88

Ursula LeGuin was my hero. And I made sure to tell her that.

In 1985, LeGuin was invited to speak at Dartmouth College by the Anthropology Department. At the time, I was an adjunct lecturer in the Anthropology Department, teaching a course in Linguistics. When I heard that LeGuin was coming to Dartmouth, I was thrilled. I was even more thrilled when I discovered that she had been seated right next to me.

"You are my hero," I whispered. I was not just starry-eyed, I was awestruck.

She ignored me.

LeGuin's book, The Left Hand of Darkness, had left an indelible mark on me when I read it in college. Up until the publication of her book, science fiction writers were essentially an old boys' club. From the first science fiction by Jules Verne, straight up through the post WWII titles of Asimov, Bradbury,  Aldiss, Vonnegut, and Anderson, men predominated. These were all great writers whose works focused on "hard" science, ethical dilemmas surrounding artificial intelligence, or space sagas, and in which women, if they appeared at all, were thrown in for sex appeal.

LeGuin changed all that with The Left Hand of Darkness, a book that explored gender. It hit the bookstores in 1969, just as the feminist movement was reaching a peak. The book not only broke the gender barrier, it featured a black protagonist, Genly Ai. LeGuin's wide-ranging explorations of sexuality, gender roles, social change, capitalism, race, Taoism, and civil disobedience struck a nerve. Those of us who were involved in the social activist movements of the 70s read, and discussed at length, every one of her books.

Because it was ground-breaking, The Left Hand of Darkness was roundly and soundly rejected by publishers. LeGuin, in an effort to encourage writers to "Hang in there!" posted the full rejection letter on her site. (Miss Kidd was her agent.)

Dear Miss Kidd, 

Ursula K. Le Guin writes extremely well, but I'm sorry to have to say that on the basis of that one highly distinguishing quality alone I cannot make you an offer for the novel. The book is so endlessly complicated by details of reference and information, the interim legends become so much of a nuisance despite their relevance, that the very action of the story seems to be to become hopelessly bogged down and the book, eventually, unreadable. The whole is so dry and airless, so lacking in pace, that whatever drama and excitement the novel might have had is entirely dissipated by what does seem, a great deal of the time, to be extraneous material. My thanks nonetheless for having thought of us. The manuscript of The Left Hand of Darkness is returned herewith. Yours sincerely, 

The Editor 

21 June, 1968 

(When it was finally published, The Left Hand of Darkness went on to win both Hugo and Nebula Awards. It has since been reprinted 30 times, and it redefined the genre.)

When I heard that Ursula LeGuin had died on January 22nd, I thought of that talk she gave at Dartmouth. She had brushed me off, but she regretted it. The next morning, she invited me to have breakfast with her. I brought my baby daughter, who was only two months old, and she expressed her joy in motherhood. And years later, when I published my first novel, a children's fantasy based on bedtime stories I had told my daughter, I sent her a copy. She wrote me a gracious note of thanks. Two decades had passed, but she had not forgotten me.

Ursula LeGuin was, and always will be, my hero.


Friday, February 9, 2018

3 New Agents Actively Seeking Mysteries, Fantasy, Romance, YA & MG, Nonfiction and More

Here are three new agents seeking clients. Jennie Kendrick is interested in YA and MG fiction, particularly Own Voices works. Sandra Jordan represents mysteries exclusively. Whitney Ross represents middle grade, young adult, and adult fiction across all genres, with an emphasis on historical, SF & fantasy, romance, and contemporary fiction. She is also open to non-fiction submissions in the areas of design, cooking, and fashion.

ALWAYS check the agency website before submitting. Agents may switch agencies or close their lists, and submission requirements may change.

If these agents do not suit your needs, you can find a comprehensive list of new and established agents seeking clients here: Agents Seeking Clients.



Jennie Kendrick at Lupine Creative

Jennie Kendrick is a former criminal defense attorney, history major, and continues to be a lifelong reader.  She began writing for Forever Young Adult, a popular review site for YA fans who are “a little less Y and a little more A” in 2013, and became an editor in early 2014. Her work with Forever Young Adult has included a review partnership with Kirkus books, travel to Book Expo of America, YALLFest and YALLWest, social media management, a podcast, and close work with many publicists and YA authors. She was a judge for the 2017 Elephant Rock Books Helen Sheehan YA publishing competition, is a part-time bookseller at The Booksmith in San Francisco, and leads the San Francisco chapter of the international Forever Young Adult book club. Her writing has appeared in Birth.Movies.Death., and Shipwreck, a humorous San Francisco literary competition.

What she is seeking: Jennie Kendrick is looking for well-researched, character-driven YA and MG fiction, particularly Own Voices works. She is particularly fond of historical fiction, paranormal fiction, classic 90s teen horror, and magical realism, but will gladly accept submissions from all YA/MG genres.

How to submit:  Please submit your query along with the first 10-15 pages of your manuscript.

She is accepting submissions immediately at: submissions@lupinegrove.com





Sandra is an author and editor and now consultant and first reader for Nancy Gallt Mysteries. To submit your work, please send one attachment that includes a brief cover letter, a one-page outline of the book and 50 double-spaced pages of the finished manuscript (remember that it must be a mystery, as described above, written for adults).

Email submissions and queries: sandra@nancygallt.com



Whitney Ross of Irene Goodman

Before joining Irene Goodman in 2018, Whitney Ross worked as an editor at Macmillan for nearly a decade, culminating in her role as a senior editor for Tor Teen, Tor, and Forge. Over the course of her career, Whitney has had the pleasure of editing many talented authors, including Susan Dennard, Cora Carmack, Eric Van Lustbader, Steven Erikson, Katie McGarry, Ann Aguirre, Dan Wells, and Stacey Kade.

What she is seeking: Whitney represents middle grade, young adult, and adult fiction across all genres, with an emphasis on historical, SF & fantasy, romance, and contemporary fiction. She is also open to non-fiction submissions in the areas of design, cooking, and fashion.

Whitney loves to read novels set in unusual time periods and locations, whether that involves a fantastical element or not. She is rarely able to resist the trickster king motif, and has a weakness for read-between-the-lines subtle romances. Yet she's constantly surprised by books not on her "wish list," and is always open to stories with compelling characters and emotionally involving plotlines.

How to submit: Email a query letter and the first ten pages, along with a synopsis (3-5 paragraphs) and bio, in the body of an email to whitney.queries@irenegoodman.com.

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

2 New Agents Seeking Fantasy, Contemporary Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Travel Writing and More

New agents are a boon to writers. They are hard working, enthusiastic, and are actively building their client lists. Joseph Parsons is looking for Non-fiction – Including literary and creative nonfiction, travel and nature writing, current events, history, biography, long-form journalism and scholarly work written for a general audience; Fiction – Contemporary (post-1945) American literary fiction. Joseph is especially seeking new voices including the work of women, people of color, and others who may have been underrepresented in past years, in particular LGBTQ and immigrant authors. Natalie Grazian is currently accepting queries for commercial, upmarket, and literary adult fiction. She would love it if you sent her contemporary fantasy.

ALWAYS check the agency website before submitting. Agents may switch agencies or close their lists, and submission requirements may change.

If these agents do not suit your needs, you can find a comprehensive list of new and established agents seeking clients here: Agents Seeking Clients.




Joseph Parsons of Holloway Literary

Joseph has worked in publishing for more than two decades, most recently at the University of North Carolina Press, where he was a senior editor, acquiring broadly in the humanities and social sciences, as well as creative nonfiction, documentary arts, current events, and history, for which one title won the Bancroft Prize. Previously, he acquired broadly for the University of Iowa Press, including for the acclaimed Sightline Books, Muse Books, and New American Canon series. Joe has also worked as a manuscript editor, journal editor for the National Humanities Center, and independent editor and writer, as well as a researcher and reporter.

He has a bachelor’s degree in Russian and East European studies from the University of Michigan and a master’s degree in political science from the University of Illinois. When not walking his dog – itself a full-time job – Joe enjoys reading contemporary fiction, nonfiction, and long-form journalism and watching basketball. Follow Joseph on Twitter @JoePParsons.

What he is seeking: Joseph is currently accepting submissions for:

Non-fiction – Including literary and creative nonfiction, travel and nature writing, current events, history, biography, long-form journalism and scholarly work written for a general audience

Fiction – Contemporary (post-1945) American literary fiction.

Joseph is especially seeking new voices including the work of women, people of color, and others who may have been underrepresented in past years, in particular LGBTQ and immigrant authors.

How to submit: Email a brief query and the first 15 pages of your manuscript pasted in the body of your email to submissions @ hollowayliteraryagency.com In the email subject header, write: Joseph/Title/Genre. You can expect a response in 6 to 8 weeks. If Joseph is interested, he’ll respond with a request for more material. Due to the number of emails he receives, Joseph may only respond if he’s interested.

If you feel that more than one agent at Holloway would be interested in your work, please only send to one agent at a time. Once you receive a response from the first agent you queried, then you may submit to another agent. Any queries sent to more than one agent at the same time will be deleted.



Natalie has a BA in English and Minor in Spanish from Santa Clara University. Upon graduating, she worked as a sales representative for W. W. Norton & Co. and interned for two literary agencies, including Martin Literary & Media Management. For two years, Natalie was the Fiction Editor of The Santa Clara Review, the oldest literary magazine on the West Coast.

What she is seeking: Natalie is currently accepting queries for commercial, upmarket, and literary adult fiction. She would love it if you sent her contemporary fantasy (in the vein of Lev Grossman’s The Magicians). She’s drawn to dark comedy that still carries a beating heart—because at the end of the day, she turns to books to find humanity. She is highly interested in reimagined myths and fairytales from different cultures, historical fiction, and a good quest narrative in any genre. More than anything, she looks for complex characters who make the unrelatable relatable, and for a smart, distinctive narrative voice. At this time, she’s not seeking military thrillers, sports stories, or romance novels.

How to submit: Please include a query letter in the body of your email and attach the first ten pages of your manuscript, preferably as a Word doc. Please send your queries to Natalie@MartinLit.com

Thursday, February 1, 2018

26 Calls for Submissions in February 2018 - Paying Markets

Pixabay
I've assembled 24 calls for submissions in February. All of these are paying markets, and none charge submission fees. As always, every genre, style, and form is wanted, from speculative fiction to poetry to personal essays.

NOTE: I post calls for submissions on the first day of every month. But as I am collecting them, I post them on my page, Calls for Submissions. You can get a jump on next month's calls for submissions by checking that page periodically throughout the month. (I only post paying markets.)
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The Southern ReviewGenre: Poetry. Payment: $25 per printed page with a maximum payment of $200, plus two copies of the issue in which the work appears and a one-year subscription to The Southern Review. Deadline: February 1, 2018. Snail mail submissions only.

The Monkey CollectiveGenre: Short stories up to 5000 words in all genres that correspond to anthology theme “the strangest place I’ve been.” Prize: Publication in the magazine and 5% of sales paid out each calendar year. Deadline: February 1, 2018.

The First LineGenre: Short story beginning with the line: "Leo massaged the back of his neck, thankful the meeting was finally over." Payment: $25.00 - $50.00 for fiction, $5.00 - $10.00 for poetry, and $25.00 for nonfiction (all U.S. dollars). Deadline: February 1, 2018.

Abyss & ApexGenre: Speculative short stories. Payment: 6 cents/word. Deadline: First week of February.

CanthiusGenre: Poetry and prose from women and genderqueer writers. Payment: $15 per poem and $50 per work of prose. Deadline: February 1, 2018. Snail mail submissions only.

OTHER COVENANTS: Alternate Histories of the Jewish PeopleGenre: Stories and poems must be in the alternate history genre and must be clearly relevant to the theme of the anthology. Length: 500–15,000 words. Payment: 8 cents/word (CAN). Deadline: February 1, 2018. Accepts some reprints.

Splickety: Extraordinary ExploitsGenre: Flash fiction, between 300 and 1,000 words long. "Bring things close to home in this action-packed adventure issue. Adventures with a supernatural twist. Artifacts with unexplained properties. Creatures that aren’t quite human. We’re looking for a real-world setting with a twist of the speculative in this issue. Think The Librarian, Indiana Jones, Warehouse 13, and Grimm." Payment: 2 cents/word. Deadline: February 9, 2018.

York Literary Review. Genre: Fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, essays, and reviews. They are also interested in submissions of visual art and photography to be featured alongside new writing.  Payment: Honorarium. Deadline: February 9, 2018.

Smoking Pen Press: A Kiss and a PromiseGenre: Romance. Payment: $25 USD, or 2 complimentary copies of the paperback (non US/Canada authors will receive their choice of a one-time payment of $25 USD, or 1 complimentary copy of the paperback). Deadline: February 14, 2018.

The Spectacle. Genre: Poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Payment: $50. Deadline: February 15, 2018.

Subprimal Poetry Art. Genres: Flash fiction and poetry. "We're looking for work that enables the reader / listener to experience something that they might not otherwise in their regular life and causes them to think. We like pieces that use language in new ways. We have a special fondness for prose poems. Voices outside of the status quo keep us awake at night." Payment: $20. Reprints $10. Deadline:  February 15, 2018.

Luna Station Quarterly. Restrictions: Open to women. Genre: Speculative fiction. Payment: $5. Deadline: February 15, 2018.

Suburban Review. Restrictions: Open to Australian women, femmes and gender non-conforming folx. Genre: Fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, comics, art. Payment: $75 - $150. Deadline: February 18, 2018.

Chicken Soup for the SoulGenre: True stories and poetry. "We are looking for stories that contain a great piece of advice that you were given or advice that you gave to someone else. Whether the advice is about a little thing that improve your everyday life, or major epiphanies that can change a life completely, we want to hear about them and how they made a difference." Payment: $200.  Deadline: February 28, 2018.

Ninth LetterGenre: Poetry and essays. Payment: $25 per page. Deadline
February 28, 2018.

DelusionGenre: Poetry and short stories on theme of Delusion. Payment: $0.01 per word, minimum of 10.00 dollars. DeadlineFebruary 28, 2018.

Blood is Thicker AnthologyRestrictions: Open to Canadian writers. Genre: Unpublished short stories between 3,000 and 7,500 words with the first line: “It was February 29 again, and I was wondering which member of my family would try to kill me this time.” Payment: CAD $0.02 per word. DeadlineFebruary 28, 2018.

Darkhouse Books: Shhhh… Murder! Genre: Cozy to cozy-noir stories featuring libraries and librarians. Payment: 50% of royalties. DeadlineFebruary 28, 2018. Some reprints accepted.

Darkhouse Books: SanctuaryGenre: Poetry, flash, short fiction, and creative nonfiction reflecting the theme of sanctuary, refuge, shelter, or asylum, from the perspective of those offering, seeking, denying, or destroying it. Payment: 50% of royalties. DeadlineFebruary 28, 2018. Some reprints accepted.

Mizna. Theme issue: The Playing Field: The Politics of Sports. This themed issue will be an exploration of the way the world of sports reflects critical issues affecting our communities--religion, race, gender, class, colonialism/occupation, patriotism, social justice, etc. We invite writing to explore this topic - poetry, stories, creative essays, flash fiction, comix, and other literary interpretations. Work must be relevant to the Arab-American audience. Payment: Honorarium. DeadlineFebruary 28, 2018.

The New QuarterlyRestrictions: Open to Canadian writers. Genre: Poetry, fiction, nonfiction. Payment: $250 for a short story or nonfiction entry, and $40 per poem or postscript story. DeadlineFebruary 28, 2018. Snail mail submissions only.

Strange ConstellationsGenre: Speculative fiction between 3000-7500 words. Payment: $30.  DeadlineFebruary 28, 2018.

Triangulation Anthology. Genre: Speculative Fiction. This year’s theme: “The Musical Edition.” Payment: $120. Deadline: February 28, 2018.

Chicken Soup for the Soul. Genre: True stories and poetry for the Holiday Edition. "We want to hear about your traditions and how they came to be. We want to hear about your holiday memories and the rituals that create the foundation of your life. We love to hear about the funny things too: the ugly holiday sweaters, the gingerbread house that kept falling down, the re-gifting embarrassments and the fruit cake disasters. Please be sure your stories are “Santa safe” so we don’t spoil the magic for any precocious young readers." Payment: $200.  Deadline: February 28, 2018.

Understorey Magazine (CAN). Restrictions: Open to writers and artists age 12-21 who live in Canada and identify as female or non-binary. Genres: Fiction, essay, poetry. Theme is "Blood." Payment: $30-$60 per piece.  Deadline: February 28, 2018.

Daguerrotyped. Genre: Poetry, prose, hybrid, fiction or nonfiction, experimental—Anything goes that has a history bent. Payment: Unspecified.  Deadline: February 28, 2018.
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